PC WORLD CHANGES MY WORLD

I received my August edition of PC World in the mail with an accompanying announcement explaining this would be my final hardcopy issue.  Like many journals, PC World has made the decision to go completely digital.  I was saddened but not surprised.

Of course, I totally understand and support the rationale for magazine and journal publishers to switch venues.  That argument has been waged and won a long time ago.  Digital formats allow for zero printing expenses (to the publisher anyway), much more user interactivity, and feature enrichments one would never experience in the conventional hardcopy format.

Simultaneously, I groan inwardly at losing once again the convenience of my hardcopy.  This is not a matter of nostalgia; it is a matter of utility.  Although I am digitally nimble and Internet savvy, and that enables me to fluidly function in cyberspace, those talents lose their luster when it comes to certain kinds of content.  For material I want to engage deeply and at length, I always revel in the hardcopy.  As I have said many times, I have never figured out how to curl up with a good computer.

A compromise works for me on this.  Whenever I initially scan my digital journals, I quickly identify those pieces I just know I must engage deeply.  I select those articles and send them to my printer.  All the rest I can engage online.  Works for me.

I am proud of myself for adjusting to technology’s demands.  Nevertheless, I do sometimes wonder . . . how will I do with that first chip implant?





About James Meadows

Currently I serve as a training team manager for Tyco Integrated Security at a customer-care center in Kansas City. Additionally, I am a business consultant, a freelance corporate writer, an Assembly of God ordained minister, a Civil Air Patrol chaplain, and a blogger.

I believe we are living in the most fascinating times of human history. To maximize the opportunities these times present, I have a passionate interest in leadership development and organizational success, both of which I view as inextricably linked.


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