THE MILLENNIAL VALUE PROPOSITION

Diane Stafford is the career columnist with The Kansas City Star newspaper.  Her insights into the labor market and career planning are always helpful.

Recently, Stafford summarized an increasingly common dynamic about the younger generations I like to call “the millennial value proposition.”  In Stafford’s words (“Why Young Achievers Don’t Stick Around” 9/16/12):

“Multiple studies find that today’s younger workers have absolutely no intention of sticking around if they don’t feel like they’re learning, growing and being valued in a job.” (p. F1)

Worker retention is a major challenge for many companies.  There was a day and a time when even if workers didn’t feel valued, they tended to tough it out anyway.  Nowadays, even in a tough job market and especially with the millennials, the millennial value proposition constantly comes into play.  It behooves companies to reevaluate exactly how they are treating their employees.  If employee engagement is not running high, then that organization will soon be suffering from a retention problem.

One of the best ways a company can capitalize on the millennial value proposition is by actively supporting its employees (of any generation).  Involving employees in special meetings, fresh opportunities, high-profile projects, and giving them some limelight all enhance employee engagement.

In spite of the regimentation so common in corporate America, companies can look for unique skills and interests within each employee.  This knowledge can enable some job tailoring.  As an employee realizes he or she is being given specific responsibilities because of his or her specific skills and interests, employee engagement rises.

Companies that want to stay on the cutting edge can’t afford to lose any skilled employee.  They especially can’t afford to lose the millennials, who are often furthest along on that vibrant cutting edge.





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About James Meadows

Currently I serve as a training team manager for Tyco Integrated Security at a customer-care center in Kansas City. Additionally, I am a business consultant, a freelance corporate writer, an Assembly of God ordained minister, a Civil Air Patrol chaplain, a blogger, and a University of Phoenix Associate Faculty member. I believe we are living in the most fascinating times of human history. To maximize the opportunities these times present, I have a passionate interest in leadership development and organizational success, both of which I view as inextricably linked.

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